Research

CHANGING DIMENSIONS OF WOMEN EMPOWERMENT: GENDERED SPATIAL ARRANGEMENTS

CHANGING DIMENSIONS OF WOMEN EMPOWERMENT: GENDERED SPATIAL ARRANGEMENTS

There have been attempts to understand the existence of gender stratification historically and across cultures. The long-drawn struggle of feminists fighting for access to certain spaces has been predominantly regarding their participation and occupying public spaces. Why is it important to redefine the concept of public spaces? What is the need for safe public space, and why is it necessary to claim public spaces for women and, thus, for the feminist movement to succeed? Some of the major themes this article engages with are the inseparability of knowledge and spaces, the connection between space and gender stratification, and notions around women’s access to certain spaces and within supposedly correct timing brackets.

Depicting Dementia: Representation of Cognitive Health and Illness in Select Animated Short Films

Depicting Dementia: Representation of Cognitive Health and Illness in Select Animated Short Films

Patients who have dementia are unable to remember events or happenings for more than a few moments at a time, resulting in them repeating their conversations, forgetting people’s faces, linguistic capabilities, etc. Unlike the popular notion, dementia affects the patient more than merely losing their immediate memory of things, events and people. At the onset, the patient may have difficulty navigating familiar environments like the supermarket or the park. Their attention span is also highly affected, with the patient zoning out of a conversation and merely staring into space mid-sentence.

The Popularity of India’s Cinema and the Role of Soft Power

The Popularity of India’s Cinema and the Role of Soft Power

Joseph Nye defined the concept of ‘Soft Power’ as the ability to obtain a preferred outcome by attraction rather than coercion or force. Thus, if a country aims to influence the choices of another country in contemporary times, it must take the route of co-option and seduction rather than threats and inducements.

Opportunities and Challenges of India’s G-20 Presidency

Opportunities and Challenges of India’s G-20 Presidency

As India has assumed the G-20 Presidency, the international political discourse and global agenda are going to see many new narratives – non-traditional issues, and of course, non-Western assertions.

India’s steady rise on the world stage is a better-late-than-never moment that many world powers, middle powers, and smaller nations expected and desired to happen, in the hope of a more balanced world order. Financially, India promises them a vast and demanding market; offers more non-prescriptive trade relations and investments to smaller nations; carries limited unilateral military and strategic ambitions, and gets along with both Western and non-Western blocs.

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Sri Lanka Under Liquidity Trap

Sri Lanka Under Liquidity Trap

Sri Lanka is currently reeling under severe inflation and foreign exchange crisis with falling foreign currency assets and the government’s inability to foot the bill for essential imports. Sri Lanka has seen an enormous capital flight of this short term capital which has triggered a massive selloff in its bond market and currency. The central bank sold dollars in the foreign exchange (forex) market to stabilize the sliding rupee.

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Lessons in Popular Resistance

Lessons in Popular Resistance

Over the past three months, the farmers of the country have shown excellent resolve and organisation against the unilateral moves of the central government. In Punjab, the ongoing agitation had begun in November 2020. Tractor rallies across the state were held and widely publicised. The central government at that time had not anticipated that it could pose a serious challenge to its credibility and prove difficult to resolve the disagreement. It was only when the farmers assembled at the borders of Delhi and demonstrated their might and determination that the government took any serious notice of the issue. On Tuesday, the protests entered Delhi and occupied the Red Fort area.

Seminar Report

Videos

Book Discussion on Born a Muslim: Some Truths About Islam in India by Ghazala Wahab

Centre for Studies of Plural Societies (CSPS) organised a book discussion on Born a Muslim: Some Truths About Islam in India on 3rd July 2022 at 4.00 PM (IST), authored by Ghazala Wahab.
Further in the discussion, Wahab highlighted the lack of participation in establishing institutions either of modern education or charitable organisations, working on modern transparent, trustworthy principles by the modern, educated, upwardly mobile Muslims. She believes that the opinions of modern people are inclusive in their outlook and conscious of the deliberate marginalisation of Muslims. However, they are discarded because the people within the community believe that modern, educated, upwardly mobile Muslims do not have any locus standi, which proved detrimental to the community. Regarding qualitative Muslim-minority educational institutions, Wahab related it to her experience living in Western Uttar Pradesh. The drive for education amongst the business families or the landed gentry is much less than families with a background or history of education, who are third or fourth-generation educated people in their homes because the former do not expect the children to seek employment outside the family businesses.

Reforming Medical Education In India: Distinguished Lecture by Prof Furqan Qamar

Prof. Furqan Qamar commenced the talk by asserting that the interest in reforming medical education has grown since the war in Ukraine. He iterated that the capacity of the medical field is severely restrained in India. However, this does not mean that the number of medical colleges and their intake capacity has remained stagnant since independence. India had only about 28 medical colleges and in 2021-22, the number of medical colleges has gone up to 595. While in 1950-51, almost all medical colleges were under government domain with the idea of training people to serve the nation. During 1991-92 this started changing as high fee charges in medical education started making entry into the system. In today’s scenario of the above 600 colleges, almost half of them are private or in the private domain. The intake is deficient, with less than 100,000 students every year, half of which goes to the government and half to the private sector.

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