Research

Gender Sensitisation and Treatment of Women in Indian Cinema

Gender Sensitisation and Treatment of Women in Indian Cinema

French feminist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir said, “Man is defined as a human being and woman as a female – whenever she behaves as a human being, she is said to imitate the male.” It is a well-known fact that art, cinema, and literature significantly impact the lives of people of an era. They cannot be considered merely sources of entertainment as they act as strong forces of power to mould and change different societal practices. It is especially true in the case of Indian cinema, as this industry is the world’s largest in movie production (with an average of 1800 or more movies produced in a year). Because of its surplus production, cinema can be considered the most accessible, hence preferred, mode of media to communicate with the public. There has been prolonged mistreatment of women in Indian cinema, and there is a need for the sensitisation of gender representation in the mainstream media. The article does a close reading of three Indian movies, Cocktail (2012), a Hindi language movie directed by Homi Adajania and Rathinirvedam (2011) and The Great Indian Kitchen (2021), Malayalam language movies directed by Rajeev Kumar and Joe Baby respectively. These three movies are taken as a mirror of society and exhibit the demeaning and trivialising of women in three major aspects: compartmentalising women into categories which do not consider their calibre or talent, objectification of women, and disregarding women as human beings in a patriarchal household setting, respectively.

Book Review: Conceptualizing Mass Violence: Representations, Recollections, and Reinterpretations

Book Review: Conceptualizing Mass Violence: Representations, Recollections, and Reinterpretations

The twentieth century has been a century of mass violence and genocides beginning with Namibia (1904-1908) and ending with Rwanda (1994). Even the slogan ‘Never Again!’ raised after the Holocaust and the UN functionaries proved to be hollow, as evident in Bangladesh (1971), Burundi (1972), Bosnia and Herzegovina (1992), and Rwanda (1994), among others. The twenty-first century is no better, as evident in Myanmar’s mass violence and ongoing ethnic cleansing against the Rohingyas. The edited volume by Navras J. Aafreedi and Priya Singh fills an important gap in mass violence scholarship with a representation of scholars from all (Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Europe and Oceania/Australasia) continents (except Antarctica) covering a wide array of themes across geographies. The book has been divided into eight themes: Narratives, Revisionism and reconstruction, Education, Reflections, Trauma, Memorialisation, Literature, Dialogue, and reconciliation. 

Sri Lanka Under Liquidity Trap

Sri Lanka Under Liquidity Trap

Sri Lanka is currently reeling under severe inflation and foreign exchange crisis with falling foreign currency assets and the government’s inability to foot the bill for essential imports. Sri Lanka has seen an enormous capital flight of this short term capital which has triggered a massive selloff in its bond market and currency. The central bank sold dollars in the foreign exchange (forex) market to stabilize the sliding rupee.

Hijab on Trial

Hijab on Trial

The hijab verdict resonates with the Babri Masjid case where the court declared that the temple should be made based on ‘faith’ on the demolition site, despite endorsing the absence of historical evidence of the destruction of the temple there.

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Seminar Report

Videos

Book Discussion on Born a Muslim: Some Truths About Islam in India by Ghazala Wahab

Centre for Studies of Plural Societies (CSPS) organised a book discussion on Born a Muslim: Some Truths About Islam in India on 3rd July 2022 at 4.00 PM (IST), authored by Ghazala Wahab.
Further in the discussion, Wahab highlighted the lack of participation in establishing institutions either of modern education or charitable organisations, working on modern transparent, trustworthy principles by the modern, educated, upwardly mobile Muslims. She believes that the opinions of modern people are inclusive in their outlook and conscious of the deliberate marginalisation of Muslims. However, they are discarded because the people within the community believe that modern, educated, upwardly mobile Muslims do not have any locus standi, which proved detrimental to the community. Regarding qualitative Muslim-minority educational institutions, Wahab related it to her experience living in Western Uttar Pradesh. The drive for education amongst the business families or the landed gentry is much less than families with a background or history of education, who are third or fourth-generation educated people in their homes because the former do not expect the children to seek employment outside the family businesses.

Reforming Medical Education In India: Distinguished Lecture by Prof Furqan Qamar

Prof. Furqan Qamar commenced the talk by asserting that the interest in reforming medical education has grown since the war in Ukraine. He iterated that the capacity of the medical field is severely restrained in India. However, this does not mean that the number of medical colleges and their intake capacity has remained stagnant since independence. India had only about 28 medical colleges and in 2021-22, the number of medical colleges has gone up to 595. While in 1950-51, almost all medical colleges were under government domain with the idea of training people to serve the nation. During 1991-92 this started changing as high fee charges in medical education started making entry into the system. In today’s scenario of the above 600 colleges, almost half of them are private or in the private domain. The intake is deficient, with less than 100,000 students every year, half of which goes to the government and half to the private sector.

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