Research

Antisemitism and Perception of Hitler in India

Antisemitism and Perception of Hitler in India

Antisemitism has been rhetorically used by Indian leaders (irrespective of their political or religious persuasion) since the time of the Freedom movement. Hindu nationalists like M.S. Golwalkar, K.B. Hedgewar, and V.D. Savarkar have used Nazi Antisemitic rhetoric to further their Islamophobic agenda in India to the extent of justifying Nazi treatment towards Jews and wishing for similar treatment against Indian Muslims.

Asia Bibi Exonerated, But Scope for Misuse of Blasphemy Law Remains Challenge for Pakistan

Asia Bibi Exonerated, But Scope for Misuse of Blasphemy Law Remains Challenge for Pakistan

Asia Bibi’s case was politicised after the then Punjab governor Salman Taseer visited her in jail in November 2010, following the pronouncement of her death, and expressed his frustration about the misuse of blasphemy laws in Pakistan. Taseer was assassinated by his own security guard Mumtaz Qadri on 4 January, 2011. Qadri’s arrest, trial, death sentence and February 2016 execution sparked huge protests and a massive funeral procession, exonerating the killer of Taseer. Since then, religious-political groups in Pakistan had been aggressively campaigning to execute Asia and were attempting to influence court procedure by campaigning against her.

Gender Sensitisation and Treatment of Women in Indian Cinema

Gender Sensitisation and Treatment of Women in Indian Cinema

French feminist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir said, “Man is defined as a human being and woman as a female – whenever she behaves as a human being, she is said to imitate the male.” It is a well-known fact that art, cinema, and literature significantly impact the lives of people of an era. They cannot be considered merely sources of entertainment as they act as strong forces of power to mould and change different societal practices. It is especially true in the case of Indian cinema, as this industry is the world’s largest in movie production (with an average of 1800 or more movies produced in a year). Because of its surplus production, cinema can be considered the most accessible, hence preferred, mode of media to communicate with the public. There has been prolonged mistreatment of women in Indian cinema, and there is a need for the sensitisation of gender representation in the mainstream media. The article does a close reading of three Indian movies, Cocktail (2012), a Hindi language movie directed by Homi Adajania and Rathinirvedam (2011) and The Great Indian Kitchen (2021), Malayalam language movies directed by Rajeev Kumar and Joe Baby respectively. These three movies are taken as a mirror of society and exhibit the demeaning and trivialising of women in three major aspects: compartmentalising women into categories which do not consider their calibre or talent, objectification of women, and disregarding women as human beings in a patriarchal household setting, respectively.

Book Review: Conceptualizing Mass Violence: Representations, Recollections, and Reinterpretations

Book Review: Conceptualizing Mass Violence: Representations, Recollections, and Reinterpretations

The twentieth century has been a century of mass violence and genocides beginning with Namibia (1904-1908) and ending with Rwanda (1994). Even the slogan ‘Never Again!’ raised after the Holocaust and the UN functionaries proved to be hollow, as evident in Bangladesh (1971), Burundi (1972), Bosnia and Herzegovina (1992), and Rwanda (1994), among others. The twenty-first century is no better, as evident in Myanmar’s mass violence and ongoing ethnic cleansing against the Rohingyas. The edited volume by Navras J. Aafreedi and Priya Singh fills an important gap in mass violence scholarship with a representation of scholars from all (Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Europe and Oceania/Australasia) continents (except Antarctica) covering a wide array of themes across geographies. The book has been divided into eight themes: Narratives, Revisionism and reconstruction, Education, Reflections, Trauma, Memorialisation, Literature, Dialogue, and reconciliation. 

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Seminar Report

Videos

Book Discussion on Annie Zaidi’s Novel City of Incident

Zaidi wondered if anyone understands the tormented relationship women have with their homes, within the four walls, with going somewhere, being allowed to go somewhere, constantly having to report back the things they do. She questioned the inability of people to understand that a woman needs a life outside her family regardless of how loving the family is. Hamid shifted her thoughts toward cities and homes’ changing experiences and behaviours during the pandemic. She dived into the themes and characters of the novel and found out that the uncanniness of home is one of the most recurring images in it. Women often don’t have their own spaces in “their homes.” They are tied by the ropes of expectations built by the dominant groups. She iterated how images of children are glued to the women in a society where people expect women to prioritise their children more than anything. Often, women have to justify their existence, even to their own families. For men, their usefulness is mainly measured by their ability to provide and support their families financially. For women, the sense of usefulness comes from their bodies, which is considered the original home of all humanity and kindness. Their failure in giving birth dislocates them as a whole. They doubt their existence in such cases. People fail to understand their psychological state.

Book Discussion on Secularism Confronts Islamism

The Centre for Studies of Plural Societies organised an online book discussion on Secularism Confronts Islamism: Divergent Paths of Transnational Negotiations in Egypt and Tunisia by Dr Mohammad Affan, Director of Research at Al Sharq Strategic Research Geneva, Switzerland on 21st February 2022. The session was chaired by Dr Omair Anas of Ankara Yıldırım Beyazıt University, Turkey. In this session, Dr Affan gave a brief introduction to his book, and he also shed some light on the various concepts like Islamism, secularism, transitional negotiations, etc.

Mode of Integration, Multiculturalism & National Identity by Prof Tariq Modood

Distuinghed lecture on Mode of Integration, Multiculturalism and National Identity was delivered by Prof. Tariq Modood, Professor of Sociology, Politics and Public Policy, and the founding director of the Centre for the Study of Ethnicity and Citizenship at the University of Bristol. The session was chaired by Prof. Tanweer Fazal, a professor at the Department of Sociology, University of Hyderabad.

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